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One Step Campaign

The One Step Campaign, a coalition of disability, advocacy and service organizations working with Disabled In Action of Metropolitan New York (DIA) and the New York City Commission on Human Rights, encourages stores, restaurants and other places of public accommodation to provide wheelchair accessibility. Many sites have a step at the entrance that prevents wheelchair users from entering.

The New York City Human Rights law requires places and providers of public accommodation to make reasonable efforts to provide access and services to all customers. The Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) says ramping a single step is likely to be readily achievable.

The One Step Campaign advocates for greater accessibility through education and persuasion by striving toward the following goals:

  1. Permit safe and independent access to facilities and services, such as stores, restaurants, banks, medical offices, libraries, museums, and theaters, for all people;

  2. Provide free consultation and technical assistance to eliminate a one step obstacle;

  3. Help avoid the possibility of a costly and lengthy lawsuit.

 

What you need to know:

  • If you are a person with a disability you have a right to independent access.

  • If you are a person with a disability you have a right to equal access to facilities and services.

  • If you are a person with a disability you have a right to a reasonable accommodation to meet your needs.

 

You can make a difference:

  1. Identify the violation. Speak to the owner or manager and inform him/her that you are unable to enter or use the premises because of a specific physical and/or policy barrier. If you are not comfortable speaking to store personnel, Disabled in Action will be able to contact the owner. Information will be kept confidential at your request.

  2. Follow up. If no accommodation is made within a reasonable period, contact DIA for a one step complaint form. See below.

  3. Complete and return the complaint form to the One Step Campaign.
    You can print out a One-Step form here (link opens in a new browser window) or, you can also fill out the One-Step Complaint Form online

 

If you need assistance filling out the form, contact Disabled in Action.

 

The One Step Campaign will:

  1. Send a letter directly to the landlord and owner explaining his/her responsibility to provide a reasonable accommodation.

  2. Submit your request to the New York City Commission on Human Rights.

  3. Request that a representative from the Commission conduct an on site survey. At that time, technical assistance is provided to the owner.

  4. Return to the site to verify the accessible accommodation.

 

The One Step Campaign makes every attempt to resolve your complaint quickly and amicably. Information will be kept confidential at your request.

www.DisabledInAction.org

718-261-3737 (voice)

Relay Calls Welcome

This document is also available in:

  • large print
  • electronic mail
  • tape
  • braille
  • a printer-friendly version (link opens in a new browser window)
  • or, you can fill out the ONE-STEP COMPLAINT FORM online

People with disabilities are also protected under the Human Rights Law in housing. A landlord must accommodate the needs of a person with a disability, including paying for structural changes (ramps, handrails, etc.), if the accommodation is deemed reasonable. If you are have a mobility disability and need access to your apartment or home, please call the Commission on Human Rights at 212-306-7330.


This website was created and is maintained by Douglas Pucci

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